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  • Coane and Associates,PLLC 3:42 pm on July 28, 2017 Permalink | Reply  

    Immigration Arrests and Raids and Employment Law Update 

    Here is a video of a speech that I gave a few months ago to an overflow crowd in Houston. I was talking about my predictions for immigration raids of churches, hospitals, synagogues, mosques and other places where immigration officials historically would not visit.

    While the video is several months old, some of my predictions are already coming to fruition, where spouses of Americans with no criminal record are being arrested and deported and where according to some of my clients, immigration officials are “rounding-up” foreigners in some of the smaller, more rural areas. With my 30+ years of experience in immigration law, I am uniquely situated to advise individuals, companies and non-federal government agencies on how our laws work and exactly what is going on right now. I have been staying very busy, lately, doing just that.

    In other matters at our office the past couple of weeks, I had the opportunity to visit with clients from some of the smaller countries of Africa, such as Equatorial Guinea, Burkina Faso (formerly known as Upper Volta) and Angola. In addition to providing legal advice to these clients, this Houston immigration lawyer and Miami immigration lawyer always finds it interesting to talk to them about their culture, language, and other aspects of their country.

    On the employment law and employment discrimination law front, I am currently in Phoenix, Arizona for two days of depositions. My client sued Dignity Health in Phoenix, alleging he was fired due to sex discrimination and retaliation. The essence of his allegations are that his boss was sleeping with his co-worker, that Dignity knew about it and allowed it to continue, and when there was a lack of funding, his supervisor chose to keep his female co-worker (the one sleeping with the boss) , rather than my client. In addition to the two days of depositions, I have been enjoying the regional food, the dry heat and 100+degree temperatures, and the sight of all the exotic desert flowers and cactus plants.

    Lastly, it has been a busy month for court hearings on our employment discrimination cases. We went to court twice this month in our client’s case against Wells Fargo, where our client claimed race discrimination, and the bank sued her back for alleging stealing money from the vault. We also had a court hearing in our client’s case against Hobby Lobby, where he alleges he was fired in retaliation for complaining about sex discrimination.

    For further information, I may be reached in Houston at 713.850.0066 or in our Miami office at 305.538.6800. I can also be reached at bruce.coane@gmail.com.

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    • Helen Surovek 6:18 pm on July 28, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      LOVE the great work you do, Bruce. Had I had the privilege of higher education, I would have been doing something similar…helping those in need of help. With the know-how to
      maneuver through the maze of our wonderful legal system. Keep up the good work~!

  • Coane and Associates,PLLC 10:13 am on November 10, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: constitutional challenges, F-1 student visa, H-4 visa   

    H-4 Visa explained 

    An H-4 visa is a visa issued by the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) to immediate family members (spouse and children under 21 years of age) of the H-1B visa holders. An H4 Visa allows the spouse or child of an H-1B Visa holder to live and study in the United States.

    USCIS allows immediate family members of H visa holders (H-1A, H-1B, H-2A, H-2B, or H-3) to get H-4 visas to lawfully come and stay in the US. These visas are usually issued at the local US consulate office abroad. However, if the person is already in US, he or she can obtain H-4 visa by filing Form I-539 for change of status.

    H-4 visa holders are not eligible to get a Social Security Number and cannot be employed, but they can hold a driver’s license, open bank accounts, and get an Individual Taxpayer Identification Number for US tax purposes.

    Family members may alternatively be admitted in other non-immigrant categories for which they qualify, such as the F-1 category for children or spouses who will be students or the H-1B category for a spouse whose employer has also obtained approval of an H-1B visa petition to employ the spouse. An H-4 visa holder is admitted to the US for the duration of the primary (H-1B, H-2A, H-2B, or H-3) visa validity.

    Since H-4 visa holders are not issued a social security number, an ITIN (Individual tax identification number) should be obtained before filing for joint tax returns by filing Form W-7. They are not authorized to work in the United States, though they are allowed to study.

    Did you know that a child’s H-4 Visa status automatically expires when the child turns 21? Even if the U.S. government mistakenly gives you an expiration date that is past the child’s birthday, your child will be out of status if he or she remains in the U.S. after turning 21.

    What can you do to prevent your child from becoming out of status? The most important thing you can do is plan ahead. There are ways for your child to obtain a different visa and change status. For example, your child might be able to enroll in school and receive an F-1 student visa. You should consult with an experienced immigration lawyer at least one year before your child turns 21 to determine how he or she can legally remain in the United States.

    ________________________________________________________________________________________________

    Bruce Coane is a leading lawyer with 30 years of experience in the field of immigration law and employment law. He may be reached via email at houstonlaw@aol.com or his website at Coane and Associates.

     
  • Coane and Associates,PLLC 3:55 am on November 6, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , fiance visa process, top 5 reasons to hire an immigration lawyer   

    Can you bring your foreign fiancé to the US for marriage? 

    Congratulations — You are newly engaged and planning to bring your foreign fiancé to the United States for marriage. You’ve done some research, and you downloaded the Form I-129F, Petition for Alien Fiancé. You’ve done your Internet research: Wikipedia, free online resources, case law, advice from friends and family, and the list goes on. You may be thinking, “This looks easy, maybe I should just do it myself. It will save me money”. Sure you can do it yourself and save money, but you do really understand the complex process? On paper it looks simple, but wait, the buck stops here.

    There are many compelling reasons to hire an immigration lawyer to handle your fiancé visa.

    Here are the top 5:

    1. Immigration Lawyers Know the Law
    U.S. Immigration law is complicated, even for some lawyers. Also, the rules are constantly changing, and it helps to have someone who is up to date on the latest laws and statutes.

    2. An Immigration Lawyer Can Represent You
    Only a licensed lawyer can represent you before the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (where the fiancé visa petition is filed), the National Visa Center (where the name checks are conducted) or at the U.S. Embassy or Consulate (where your fiancé will be interviewed and the K-1 visa will be issued).

    3. An Immigration Lawyer Get Things Done Faster
    If you choose to prepare your own fiancé visa petition, you will quickly realize there are a number of forms required. You may have to stop frequently to do more research. An experienced immigration lawyer will prepare your fiancé visa petition quickly and correctly.

    4. An Immigration Lawyer Can Prevent Costly Mistakes
    There are multiple rules regarding your fiancé’s ability to travel to the United States during the fiancé visa process. For example, if your fiancé is issued a K-1 visa, they must use it to enter the U.S. and not any other visa and you must marry within a specified period of time. Mistakes in this regard can result in you having to start the fiancé visa process all over again (including paying the fees) or your fiancé being unable to remain in the U.S.

    5. An Immigration Lawyer Can Prevent Lengthy Delays
    Out of all the reasons for hiring an immigration lawyer, this is the most compelling for many engaged couples. According to the Office of Immigration Statistics, approximately 40 to 60% of all fiancé visa petitions filed every year are not approved. Thus, an experienced, knowledgeable immigration lawyer can prevent any lengthy delays and give you peace of mind.

    If the USCIS finds some technical mistake or omission in the paperwork you submitted to them, they will send you a formal letter (also known as a Request for Evidence or RFE) telling you what you did wrong. This form will often be sent several months after you originally filed your petition. Often, when you submit the required correction, they will again wait several months and again return the forms to you with another cover-sheet informing you of a second technical error or omission. Even writing N/A in a box can result in an RFE. Each RFE may add about six more months to the process.

    Call us at Coane & Associates at 713-850-0066 (Houston) or 305-538-6800 (Miami) today for a consultation with one of our experienced immigration lawyers. Also, visit us on the web at http://www.coane.com.

     
    • Emily 1:20 pm on November 6, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      That’s some good info to remember. Thanks.

    • William 3:18 am on November 8, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Mr. Coane, what is the fee for bringing my fiance to the US from the Malaysia?

    • Walter Chandler 12:58 am on November 10, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      My girlfriend lives in China. How difficult would it be to bring her to the the USA? I plan on marrying her, but not until early next year. What’s the process and how complex is it really? Do you charge an hourly fee or a flat rate fee? I currently live in Austin and but have a house in Houston. However, our permanent residence will ultimately be in the Woodlands area. Thanks, Walt

    • Fiancé Visa Attorney 9:02 am on June 15, 2011 Permalink | Reply

      I always admire the way you present your blog site posts.They are always so informative and neatly placed with the simplest of words used.Thanks a lot for sharing.

  • Coane and Associates,PLLC 1:51 pm on November 5, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , green card holder, immigration quote   

    Green Cards come faster for spouses and unmarried children of Green Card Holders 

    There has always been an immigration quota for spouses and unmarried children of green card holders, to immigrate to the USA. That quota typically took 3-7 years before being able to get a green card, thereby keeping many families separated from one another.

    Just recently,in the late-summer of 2010, that green card quota has surged ahead so that instead of waiting 3-7 years, these individuals only need to wait about 5 months.

    In past years, the spouse of a green card holder would not even have a case filed, rather they would wait five years until the green card holding spouse became a USA citizen, before filing a case. That strategy no longer makes sense with a quota that takes only 5 months. As a result, our office has been filing many of these “2a preference cases,” in order to allow families to legally immigrate and be together again.

    The green card sponsor, such as the parent sponsoring unmarried children, does not even need to be in the USA to file the case. The entire visa petition process is all done by mail.

     
    • nancy 4:00 pm on September 16, 2011 Permalink | Reply

      What about age limit ? Does it matter how old the person in question is ?? I am 28 and my parents and sisters all have green cards. I alone am living in India and the youngest. Can my parents file for a green card for me ? I am unmarried and only child left behind. How long will it take for my green card to come if at all it is possible for my parents to file a petition for me ? Thanks.

      • Coane & Associates 3:22 pm on January 18, 2012 Permalink | Reply

        Parents can (and should) file, but it can take 3-10 years once you get on the waiting list, due to the quota.

    • ATUL SAINI 8:13 pm on March 18, 2012 Permalink | Reply

      I am US citizen. I have my brother in India he is unmarried age is 26 years. I want to bring him to US. MY MOM is green card holder.

      So what is fastest way that he can come to US to join us ?
      Which of the following option takes less time ?, what is estimated time ?and under what category we should apply his case to join us ?.

      1. If i(US citizen) file his case for immmigration

      or

      2. My MOM (Green card holder)files his case under Unmarried son of green card holder over the age of 21 year

      Or

      Please suggest some other way.

      Thanks with regards,

      Atul
      Cell 209-417-7248

    • Coane & Associates 2:44 am on June 14, 2012 Permalink | Reply

      There are several options, but certainly having your mother file is one of them.

    • precillia 11:30 am on April 17, 2013 Permalink | Reply

      i am green card holder ,my husband is us citizen.i want to file for my two kids age 8 and 19 ,the older one is unmarried who should file for them me or husband and how long will it take

    • Anonymous 7:57 pm on October 4, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      Hi,
      I have not found anything anywhere else stating that the process for an I married child of a green card holder takes only 5 months.
      Can you provide more information on this?

      Thanks

    • Manzoor shah 6:32 pm on June 23, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Hello sir, my name is Manzoor shah from Pakistan .sir my mother, father and sister go to USA march 2015 , my mother father and sister green card holder , me and my little brother live in Pakistan . Me and my brother not going to USA . Me and my brother age 21 year older . Sir my parents potion me and my brother how much proses time . Sir ple help me

    • Bruce Coane 4:41 pm on June 28, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      he State Department publishes the various waiting times under the quota system. For example, right now, for children of lawful residents who are single and over-21, the government is giving green cards to those who filed petitions on or before Oct. 15, 2008.

    • fozi 5:54 am on January 20, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      my parents coming soon to immigration visa in USA But My younger brother unmarried 26 age alone in Pakistan How to come with my parents plz tell me

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