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  • Coane and Associates,PLLC 3:42 pm on July 28, 2017 Permalink | Reply  

    Immigration Arrests and Raids and Employment Law Update 

    Here is a video of a speech that I gave a few months ago to an overflow crowd in Houston. I was talking about my predictions for immigration raids of churches, hospitals, synagogues, mosques and other places where immigration officials historically would not visit.

    While the video is several months old, some of my predictions are already coming to fruition, where spouses of Americans with no criminal record are being arrested and deported and where according to some of my clients, immigration officials are “rounding-up” foreigners in some of the smaller, more rural areas. With my 30+ years of experience in immigration law, I am uniquely situated to advise individuals, companies and non-federal government agencies on how our laws work and exactly what is going on right now. I have been staying very busy, lately, doing just that.

    In other matters at our office the past couple of weeks, I had the opportunity to visit with clients from some of the smaller countries of Africa, such as Equatorial Guinea, Burkina Faso (formerly known as Upper Volta) and Angola. In addition to providing legal advice to these clients, this Houston immigration lawyer and Miami immigration lawyer always finds it interesting to talk to them about their culture, language, and other aspects of their country.

    On the employment law and employment discrimination law front, I am currently in Phoenix, Arizona for two days of depositions. My client sued Dignity Health in Phoenix, alleging he was fired due to sex discrimination and retaliation. The essence of his allegations are that his boss was sleeping with his co-worker, that Dignity knew about it and allowed it to continue, and when there was a lack of funding, his supervisor chose to keep his female co-worker (the one sleeping with the boss) , rather than my client. In addition to the two days of depositions, I have been enjoying the regional food, the dry heat and 100+degree temperatures, and the sight of all the exotic desert flowers and cactus plants.

    Lastly, it has been a busy month for court hearings on our employment discrimination cases. We went to court twice this month in our client’s case against Wells Fargo, where our client claimed race discrimination, and the bank sued her back for alleging stealing money from the vault. We also had a court hearing in our client’s case against Hobby Lobby, where he alleges he was fired in retaliation for complaining about sex discrimination.

    For further information, I may be reached in Houston at 713.850.0066 or in our Miami office at 305.538.6800. I can also be reached at bruce.coane@gmail.com.

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    • Helen Surovek 6:18 pm on July 28, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      LOVE the great work you do, Bruce. Had I had the privilege of higher education, I would have been doing something similar…helping those in need of help. With the know-how to
      maneuver through the maze of our wonderful legal system. Keep up the good work~!

  • Coane and Associates,PLLC 8:44 pm on June 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply  

    Police Right to Act as Immigration Officers 

    CBP Officers pay tribute to fellow fallen officers during a Law Enforcement memorial service in Washington D.C.

     

    In certain parts of the country, police are taking it upon themselves to act as immigration officers. In the most recent case of illegal arrests and detentions, Ariel Vences-Lopez, a 23 year old from Minneapolis was detained by a transit rail police officer. Mr. Lopez failed to pay his fare and refused to verbally respond. This led to police officer, Andy Lamers, proceeding to taser and detain Mr. Lopez due to his immigration status.

    In the New York Times article, police Chief John Harrington states that, “it is not his department’s policy to question riders about their immigration status. Harrington said the officer who questioned Vences-Lopez in the video is no longer with the department”. The police officer who over-stepped his power was disciplined.

    While most state governments ensure to keep the line between police officers and immigration officers very clear and even punishable if crossed, the State of Texas encourages their police officers to ask for immigration status under Senate Bill 4 (SB4). This new law signed by Governor Gregg Abbott, grants local police the power to act as federal immigration officers. In an attempt to curb illegal immigration, Texas has taken a very tough stand against immigrants.

    Senate Bill 4, which goes into effect on September 1, 2017 is already creating a lot of negative backlash.  Now a simple act like driving without a license can get you detained and even deported if you are of color. Police are even encouraged to ask for immigration status in domestic violence calls.  In another controversial news story from The Washington Post, a woman was detained after seeking domestic abuse protection at a Texas courthouse.

    For further information, this Houston immigration lawyer and Miami immigration lawyer can be contacted at 713.850.0066, 305.538.6800 or bruce.coane@gmail.com.

     
  • Coane and Associates,PLLC 9:00 am on October 4, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: ,   

    Another DREAM Act-Deferred Action Case 

    Today, I got hired on another DREAM Act-deferred action type immigration case.

    Too bad the President had to order this program and that Congress is so politicized that they can’t agree to help young people. My new client is a nice 18 yr old girl from Mexico who was brought to America as a baby. She knows how to drive, but can’t get a license; she finished high school, but can’t go to college without proper ID. The State of Texas makes it very difficult for undocumented immigrants to enroll in college and to get a driver’s license.

    Thanks to the DREAM Act, or in particular, the President’s Deferred Action for Childhood arrivals program, I will hopefully get my 18 yr old client a work permit, social security number and a driver’s license in just a few short months. If you want to know more about this program, I made a video about it which you can watch here.

    Almost 100,000 young people have applied under this new program. It is believed that hundreds of thousands more are eligible, but have not come forward yet for various reasons. Some individuals worry that they may be disqualified due to an arrest or a short visit abroad. Our law firm takes on those more difficult cases, as well, and we do consultations to discuss such cases in-person, or via Skype or phone.

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    About the author: Bruce Coane is an attorney who specializes in labor and employment law and immigration law, with offices in Florida and Texas. He may be reached at houstonlaw@aol.com, 713-850-0066 or 305-538-6800.

     
  • Coane and Associates,PLLC 1:10 am on September 14, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , ,   

    Disability Naturalization – A Way for Older Residents to Become a USA Citizen 

    In order to become a USA citizen, a person, generally, must first be a lawful permanent resident (green card) for a number of years. In addition, the person must be able to speak English, pass a history test in English and be able to read and write English.

    U.S. Citizenship Naturalization

    photo: Flickr

    Many older residents are unable to understand English sufficiently to pass the test, and therefore never get USA citizenship. There is a solution for those struggling with English, and that is through disability naturalization.

    The law provides that if a person is disabled, the English language requirements can be waived. At our law firm, we have helped many people become U.S. citizens, where they could not learn English. In order to qualify, the individual must be certified by a doctor to have a disability that prevents them from learning English. Many times this could be onset dementia, Alzheimers, or other less tragic illnesses that may be affecting memory or language skills.

    Any older person who cannot get their naturalization due to lack of English skills should definitely explore citizenship through naturalization through the disability waiver.

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    About the author: Bruce Coane is an attorney who specializes in labor and employment law and immigration law, with offices in Florida and Texas. He may be reached at houstonlaw@aol.com, 713-850-0066 or 305-538-6800.

     
  • Coane and Associates,PLLC 9:32 am on August 17, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , ,   

    Deferred Action and Work Permits: No Need to Wait in Long Lines 

    The front page of Thursday’s New York Times, showed a long line of people at a local U.S. Immigration office seeking information and forms about the new rule allowing work permits and deferred action status for young people.

    All of the information and forms are available online at the USCIS website, and it is ironic that young people, the largest users of everything internet-related, would be out in the hot sun lining up at the immigration office. Every answer to every possible question, in general, is available on the CIS website. Of course, there are grey areas, and from my perspective, the worst person to ask about grey areas would be an immigration office employee who does not adjudicate the applications. Applicants with grey area questions or other serious immigration issues would be well-advised to seek the help of a competent immigration lawyer.

    Finally, while the government made the forms and information available on August 15, the local offices are not accepting the completed applications. Like all immigration forms, the applications must be mailed in, and I always recommend it be done by certified mail.

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    About the author: Bruce Coane is an attorney who specializes in labor and employment law and immigration law, with offices in Florida and Texas. He may be reached at houstonlaw@aol.com, 713-850-0066 or 305-538-6800.

     
  • Coane and Associates,PLLC 5:25 am on August 16, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Form I-821D,   

    Deferred Action “Amnesty” for Young People Has Complicated Instructions 

    In true government fashion, the new deferred action program has 9 pages of instructions on how to fill out the form and how to be qualified. It reminds me of reading the instructions to tax forms, although in this situation, the immigration service uses a larger font than the IRS, making the instructions more reader friendly. Either way, if an applicant has any issues or does not have lots of documents, they may have difficulty proving they are entitled to deferred action and the work permit that comes with it.

    __________________________________________________________________________________________________

    About the author: Bruce Coane is an attorney who specializes in labor and employment law and immigration law, with offices in Florida and Texas. He may be reached at houstonlaw@aol.com, 713-850-0066 or 305-538-6800.

     
  • Coane and Associates,PLLC 8:23 am on July 5, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: cancellation of removal, ,   

    Deportation for Drug Possession? 

    Today I am preparing for an immigration court trial that takes place later this week.

    My client is from Honduras and has been a legal immigrant for over 15 years. He has been eligible for U.S.citizenship for many years but never applied. Has he applied and become a U.S.citizen, then he would have not been subject to these deportation proceedings.

    He was arrested for possession of cocaine with intent to distribute. He plead guilty to the lesser offense of possession, but still must fight immigration allegations that he was “dealing.”

    At trial this week, we will need to prove that he was not dealing cocaine, and that the large quantity he was charged with possessing was not his or otherwise not under his control.

    Fortunately, a law known as cancellation of removal allows a judge to let our client keep his green card (legal immigrant status) if we can prove he’s not a dealer and that there are equities in his favor.

    One final note, and that is, there is mandatory jail detention for any legal immigrant charged with a drug offense other than, perhaps, simple possession of a small quantity of marijuana. So, my client has been in immigration jail for many months, waiting for this trial which will get him released immediately if he wins.

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    About the author: Bruce Coane is an attorney who specializes in labor and employment law and immigration law, with offices in Florida and Texas. He may be reached at houstonlaw@aol.com, 713-850-0066 or 305-538-6800.

     
    • claire 10:41 am on May 20, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      what happens if u are married to a us citizen and they bring drugs into your home to sell but u never do drugs and are not involved can u get deported and could you lose your licence if u are an attorney . Is this worse than marrying a stranger and being done for marraige fraud. please advice . please it’s for my bf and she won’t visit a lawyer for advice she lives in N.Y. and her bf Is a felon

  • Coane and Associates,PLLC 4:50 am on June 20, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: amnesty, , ,   

    The New Immigration Status for Young People 

    The government has announced an “amnesty” for young people, via a program called deferred action. Here’s my latest video where I explain the process.

    Basically, the immigration program is for people 30 years old and younger, who came to the USA before the age of 16 and have lived here for at least 5 years. There are other requirements, as well, and each case will be decided based on its own merit. Potential applicants can begin collecting evidence in order to submit it when the government opens the application period.

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    About the author: Bruce Coane is an attorney who specializes in labor and employment law and immigration law, with offices in Florida and Texas. He may be reached at houstonlaw@aol.com, 713-850-0066 or 305-538-6800.

     
  • Coane and Associates,PLLC 3:25 am on June 17, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: ,   

    Government to Give Work Permits and Legal Status to Certain Undocumented Immigrants 

    Yesterday, the President announced that the government is going to stop deporting certain young people and to give them quasi-legal status in the U.S.

    Image courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net

    The new rule, effective immediately applies to most undocumented individuals under age 30 who have lived in the U.S. for at least 5 years.

    The new status is called “deferred action” and enables a person to get a work permit, which is the key to getting a social security number and work permit.

    Our law firm is already receiving many inquiries about this, and applicants can make requests for this status right now. This new rule is similar to the proposed Dream Act, but without all the rules, forms and requirements.

    __________________________________________________________________________________________________

    About the author: Bruce Coane is an attorney who specializes in labor and employment law and immigration law, with offices in Florida and Texas. He may be reached at houstonlaw@aol.com, 713-850-0066 or 305-538-6800.

     
  • Coane and Associates,PLLC 7:15 pm on June 12, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , immigrant investors,   

    Immigrant Investors at Record Levels in USA 

    Here is an interesting article about a growing trend of immigrant investors.

    Citizenship for Sale: Foreign Investors Flock to U.S.

    Not too long ago I spoke on a radio program about such investments that result in a green card for immigrants.

    The government allows green cards for two types of investments. For a passive investor, it is $500,000, and for an active investor who will start his/her own business, the investment is $1million.

    __________________________________________________________________________________________________

    About the author: Bruce Coane is an attorney who specializes in labor and employment law and immigration law, with offices in Florida and Texas. He may be reached at houstonlaw@aol.com, 713-850-0066 or 305-538-6800.

     
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