Updates from October, 2012 Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • Coane & Associates 9:00 am on October 4, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: ,   

    Another DREAM Act-Deferred Action Case 

    Today, I got hired on another DREAM Act-deferred action type immigration case.

    Too bad the President had to order this program and that Congress is so politicized that they can’t agree to help young people. My new client is a nice 18 yr old girl from Mexico who was brought to America as a baby. She knows how to drive, but can’t get a license; she finished high school, but can’t go to college without proper ID. The State of Texas makes it very difficult for undocumented immigrants to enroll in college and to get a driver’s license.

    Thanks to the DREAM Act, or in particular, the President’s Deferred Action for Childhood arrivals program, I will hopefully get my 18 yr old client a work permit, social security number and a driver’s license in just a few short months. If you want to know more about this program, I made a video about it which you can watch here.

    Almost 100,000 young people have applied under this new program. It is believed that hundreds of thousands more are eligible, but have not come forward yet for various reasons. Some individuals worry that they may be disqualified due to an arrest or a short visit abroad. Our law firm takes on those more difficult cases, as well, and we do consultations to discuss such cases in-person, or via Skype or phone.

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    About the author: Bruce Coane is an attorney who specializes in labor and employment law and immigration law, with offices in Florida and Texas. He may be reached at houstonlaw@aol.com, 713-850-0066 or 305-538-6800.

     
  • Coane & Associates 1:10 am on September 14, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , US Naturalization   

    Disability Naturalization – A Way for Older Residents to Become a USA Citizen 

    In order to become a USA citizen, a person, generally, must first be a lawful permanent resident (green card) for a number of years. In addition, the person must be able to speak English, pass a history test in English and be able to read and write English.

    U.S. Citizenship Naturalization

    photo: Flickr

    Many older residents are unable to understand English sufficiently to pass the test, and therefore never get USA citizenship. There is a solution for those struggling with English, and that is through disability naturalization.

    The law provides that if a person is disabled, the English language requirements can be waived. At our law firm, we have helped many people become U.S. citizens, where they could not learn English. In order to qualify, the individual must be certified by a doctor to have a disability that prevents them from learning English. Many times this could be onset dementia, Alzheimers, or other less tragic illnesses that may be affecting memory or language skills.

    Any older person who cannot get their naturalization due to lack of English skills should definitely explore citizenship through naturalization through the disability waiver.

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    About the author: Bruce Coane is an attorney who specializes in labor and employment law and immigration law, with offices in Florida and Texas. He may be reached at houstonlaw@aol.com, 713-850-0066 or 305-538-6800.

     
  • Coane & Associates 9:32 am on August 17, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , ,   

    Deferred Action and Work Permits: No Need to Wait in Long Lines 

    The front page of Thursday’s New York Times, showed a long line of people at a local U.S. Immigration office seeking information and forms about the new rule allowing work permits and deferred action status for young people.

    All of the information and forms are available online at the USCIS website, and it is ironic that young people, the largest users of everything internet-related, would be out in the hot sun lining up at the immigration office. Every answer to every possible question, in general, is available on the CIS website. Of course, there are grey areas, and from my perspective, the worst person to ask about grey areas would be an immigration office employee who does not adjudicate the applications. Applicants with grey area questions or other serious immigration issues would be well-advised to seek the help of a competent immigration lawyer.

    Finally, while the government made the forms and information available on August 15, the local offices are not accepting the completed applications. Like all immigration forms, the applications must be mailed in, and I always recommend it be done by certified mail.

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    About the author: Bruce Coane is an attorney who specializes in labor and employment law and immigration law, with offices in Florida and Texas. He may be reached at houstonlaw@aol.com, 713-850-0066 or 305-538-6800.

     
  • Coane & Associates 5:25 am on August 16, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Form I-821D,   

    Deferred Action “Amnesty” for Young People Has Complicated Instructions 

    In true government fashion, the new deferred action program has 9 pages of instructions on how to fill out the form and how to be qualified. It reminds me of reading the instructions to tax forms, although in this situation, the immigration service uses a larger font than the IRS, making the instructions more reader friendly. Either way, if an applicant has any issues or does not have lots of documents, they may have difficulty proving they are entitled to deferred action and the work permit that comes with it.

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    About the author: Bruce Coane is an attorney who specializes in labor and employment law and immigration law, with offices in Florida and Texas. He may be reached at houstonlaw@aol.com, 713-850-0066 or 305-538-6800.

     
  • Coane & Associates 8:23 am on July 5, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: cancellation of removal, ,   

    Deportation for Drug Possession? 

    Today I am preparing for an immigration court trial that takes place later this week.

    My client is from Honduras and has been a legal immigrant for over 15 years. He has been eligible for U.S.citizenship for many years but never applied. Has he applied and become a U.S.citizen, then he would have not been subject to these deportation proceedings.

    He was arrested for possession of cocaine with intent to distribute. He plead guilty to the lesser offense of possession, but still must fight immigration allegations that he was “dealing.”

    At trial this week, we will need to prove that he was not dealing cocaine, and that the large quantity he was charged with possessing was not his or otherwise not under his control.

    Fortunately, a law known as cancellation of removal allows a judge to let our client keep his green card (legal immigrant status) if we can prove he’s not a dealer and that there are equities in his favor.

    One final note, and that is, there is mandatory jail detention for any legal immigrant charged with a drug offense other than, perhaps, simple possession of a small quantity of marijuana. So, my client has been in immigration jail for many months, waiting for this trial which will get him released immediately if he wins.

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    About the author: Bruce Coane is an attorney who specializes in labor and employment law and immigration law, with offices in Florida and Texas. He may be reached at houstonlaw@aol.com, 713-850-0066 or 305-538-6800.

     
    • claire 10:41 am on May 20, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      what happens if u are married to a us citizen and they bring drugs into your home to sell but u never do drugs and are not involved can u get deported and could you lose your licence if u are an attorney . Is this worse than marrying a stranger and being done for marraige fraud. please advice . please it’s for my bf and she won’t visit a lawyer for advice she lives in N.Y. and her bf Is a felon

  • Coane & Associates 4:50 am on June 20, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: amnesty, , ,   

    The New Immigration Status for Young People 

    The government has announced an “amnesty” for young people, via a program called deferred action. Here’s my latest video where I explain the process.

    Basically, the immigration program is for people 30 years old and younger, who came to the USA before the age of 16 and have lived here for at least 5 years. There are other requirements, as well, and each case will be decided based on its own merit. Potential applicants can begin collecting evidence in order to submit it when the government opens the application period.

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    About the author: Bruce Coane is an attorney who specializes in labor and employment law and immigration law, with offices in Florida and Texas. He may be reached at houstonlaw@aol.com, 713-850-0066 or 305-538-6800.

     
  • Coane & Associates 3:25 am on June 17, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: ,   

    Government to Give Work Permits and Legal Status to Certain Undocumented Immigrants 

    Yesterday, the President announced that the government is going to stop deporting certain young people and to give them quasi-legal status in the U.S.

    Image courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net

    The new rule, effective immediately applies to most undocumented individuals under age 30 who have lived in the U.S. for at least 5 years.

    The new status is called “deferred action” and enables a person to get a work permit, which is the key to getting a social security number and work permit.

    Our law firm is already receiving many inquiries about this, and applicants can make requests for this status right now. This new rule is similar to the proposed Dream Act, but without all the rules, forms and requirements.

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    About the author: Bruce Coane is an attorney who specializes in labor and employment law and immigration law, with offices in Florida and Texas. He may be reached at houstonlaw@aol.com, 713-850-0066 or 305-538-6800.

     
  • Coane & Associates 7:15 pm on June 12, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , immigrant investors,   

    Immigrant Investors at Record Levels in USA 

    Here is an interesting article about a growing trend of immigrant investors.

    Citizenship for Sale: Foreign Investors Flock to U.S.

    Not too long ago I spoke on a radio program about such investments that result in a green card for immigrants.

    The government allows green cards for two types of investments. For a passive investor, it is $500,000, and for an active investor who will start his/her own business, the investment is $1million.

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    About the author: Bruce Coane is an attorney who specializes in labor and employment law and immigration law, with offices in Florida and Texas. He may be reached at houstonlaw@aol.com, 713-850-0066 or 305-538-6800.

     
  • Coane & Associates 6:38 am on May 6, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , undocumented women   

    War On Undocumented Women 

    Too bad that politics has to interfere with this important immigration law that has been on the books for almost 20 years.

    Read this article from The Huffington Post.

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    About the author: Bruce Coane is an attorney who specializes in labor and employment law, and, immigration law, with offices in Florida and Texas. He may be reached at houstonlaw@aol.com, 713-850-0066 or 305-538-6800.

     
  • Coane & Associates 2:45 am on May 2, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: I-9 form, immigrant workers, , Waste Management facility   

    Immigrant Workers Arrested at Waste Management Facility 

    In an immigration raid last week, just a few miles from our Houston office, the Houston Chronicle reported that officials arrested 16 workers at a Waste Management facility. The company stated the workers were not their employees, but third party temporary workers.

    No doubt the company would make that argument since the law provides employer sanctions for hiring undocumented workers. Even in a situation where the employer claims the workers are independent contractors, there can be penalties if the employer knew the workers were undocumented.

    The 16 workers are from El Salvador, Honduras and Mexico. Generally, such workers are not immediately deported (unless they waive their rights), but rather they go through deportation proceedings which can take years. Moreover, if eligible, they can be awarded a green card by the immigration judge.

    The government conducts these raids from time to time and arrests individuals who appear to be foreign and undocumented. An employer is required to get I-9 forms with proof of legal status completed for all workers, including Americans, but  not for  contractors. There are serious civil and criminal penalties for violating the law.

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    About the author: Bruce Coane is an attorney who specializes in labor and employment law, and, immigration law, with offices in Florida and Texas. He may be reached at houstonlaw@aol.com, 713-850-0066 or 305-538-6800.

     
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