Updates from August, 2018 Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • Coane and Associates,PLLC 9:11 am on August 15, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: #DHS, PublicCharge, Refugees,   

    U.S. Citizenship and Green Cards Denied to Legal Immigrants who Legally Received Government Benefits? 

    I was quoted in this news article this week, about a story concerning the administration’s new way of looking at the immigration law’s public charge language.

    Generally, no person may immigrate (other than perhaps, refugees) to the United States unless they can prove they will not become a public charge, meaning, they won’t need the government to support them.

    The administration recently announced that they will be looking at the legal receipt of government benefits as evidence that a person is, in fact, a public charge. The article discusses this in greater detail.

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    Trump ‘planning to make it harder for legal immigrants to gain citizenship’

    https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/us-politics/legal-immigration-us-citizenship-trump-policy-stephen-miller-immigrants-a8481606.html

    For further information, this Houston immigration lawyer and Miami immigration lawyer can be reached at bruce.coane@gmail.com, 713.850.0066 or 305.538.6800.

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  • Coane and Associates,PLLC 5:24 pm on May 29, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: #ImmigrationDelays, #Processing   

    2018 Immigration Delays in Work Permits and Visas 

    Here is my latest video where I talk about delays in the processing of immigration cases. Click to view video.

    For further information, this Houston immigration lawyer and Miami immigration lawyer can be reached at bruce.coane@gmail.com, 713.850.0066 or 305.538.6800.

     
  • Coane and Associates,PLLC 2:43 pm on May 15, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , ,   

    Immigration decisions Threaten Rule of Law 

    With the President‘s proclamation of Buy American-Hire American and with “no tolerance” declarations coming from Homeland Security and the Attorney General, the immigration service (USCIS) has been issuing illogical decisions in many cases which fail to follow the rule of law.

    Our immigration system is based on laws and federal regulations. As a Board Certified Immigration lawyer I am hearing reports  from immigrants and their attorneys across the country that the government is ignoring the law and denying otherwise approvable immigration cases. In cases of legal immigrants that were previously approved, such as non-immigrant investors, intra-company transfers and other temporary workers these people are seeing their renewal applications denied. The law has not changed, but the government is too often choosing to ignore the law or otherwise is giving the law a skewed interpretation never seen in historical precedent.

    At my office, this Houston immigration lawyer and Miami immigration lawyer has seen cases based on clear evidence being denied. The USCIS in many cases is completely ignoring the evidence and denying cases with no reasonable or logical explanation, thereby making a mockery of the rule of law. I am seeing this trend across the board, from deportation cases, to business immigration cases, to immigration marriage cases and to student visa cases. It is also seeping into the political asylum process and every other type of immigration case.

    It used to be that if a case is mistakenly denied or denied because the government overlooked certain evidence, a person could file a Motion to Reopen or Motion to Reconsider. Unfortunately, that process is also being made into a mockery. Either the USCIS chooses to ignore such motions to fix a denial, by letting them sit there for years with no decision (while the person remains subject to deportation while waiting), or they  deny the motion on improper and wrong technical grounds without considering the merits of the motion. At this point, I often tell my clients not to bother with such motions.

    What is an American spouse or  sponsoring company to do when they follow all the rules and receive an unfair decision? For years, the final answer for my clients has been litigation. For many years, I have filed lawsuits against Homeland Security and other government agencies for wrongful denials of immigration cases. While these have been few and far between over the years, the recent uptick in illogical, unfair, and, dare I say–illegal—denials, warrants the need for more  immigration lawsuits to be brought.

    Ultimately, a federal judge has the ability to order the reversal of a decision if it is arbitrary, capricious or not in accordance with the law. I encourage immigrants, non-immigrant workers, companies, American spouses of foreign nationals, immigrant students and others to challenge these improper denials by taking their cases to federal court and asking a federal judge to consider the evidence (something that USCIS is all-to-often failing to do).

    For further information, this Houston immigration lawyer (713.850.0066) and Miami immigration lawyer (305.538.6800) may be reached by phone or via email at bruce.coane@gmail.com.

     

     
  • Coane and Associates,PLLC 7:58 pm on March 6, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Dreamers   

    Dreamers and the End of DACA, with Board Certified Immigration Attorney Bruce Coane 

    Who are the “Dreamers” that we hear about in the immigration debate? What is DACA? I explain it all in this short video.

    As a Houston Immigration Lawyer and Miami Immigration Lawyer, I use these words at work on almost a daily basis. There are hundreds of thousands of young people who got work permits under President Obama’s Executive Order called DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals).

    These young adults, who came here illegally as young children and dream about one day being “legal” in the U.S. are known as Dreamers. Many of them already have a work permit thanks to DACA, but President Trump canceled the DACA program as of March 5, 2018, and these young adults can no longer get their work permits or their legal “DACA” status renewed.

    For more, check out my video.

     

    For further information, I can be reached at 713.850.0066 or 305.538.6800, or by email at bruce.coane@gmail.com

     
  • Coane and Associates,PLLC 3:39 pm on February 14, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: i9, ICE, w4, Work authorization, work permit   

    Employers will be seeing stepped-up Immigration Inspections 

    In a recent article in the Houston Chronicle, it was noted that ICE will engage in stepped-up enforcement at work-sites, looking for undocumented workers or other violations of immigration law.

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    http://www.houstonchronicle.com/business/columnists/tomlinson/article/Employers-should-prepare-for-immigration-12486366.php

    It is unlawful for an employer to hire or employ a person who is not a citizen or otherwise authorized to work in the United States.

    There are severe penalties for employers that fail to get a properly completed I-9 form from every worker. These forms are just as important as the W-4 or background check done for every new worker.

    If the I-9 form is not properly signed or dated, or missing information, there can be huge paperwork penalties that amount to tens of thousands of dollars. This Houston immigration lawyer and Miami immigration lawyer has defended businesses on such cases in the past, helping clients to avoid huge penalties.

    The other issue is that if ICE wants to, they can criminally charge the employer and arrest the owners of the business if they find any undocumented workers. It is very important for employers to make sure that their workers are all properly documented, or the employer should consider terminating the worker or helping them to apply for a work permit. Even for undocumented workers, there are often ways to get work permits.

    For further information, I may be reached at bruce.coane@gmail.com or at 713.850.0066 or 305.538.6800.

     

     
  • Coane and Associates,PLLC 10:04 pm on November 7, 2017 Permalink | Reply  

    Citizenship Applications in the U.S. Surge as Immigration Talk Toughens 

    This recent immigration article in the New York Times highlighted what I have been telling clients for many years.

    I have often urged my legal permanent resident friends and clients to become a USA citizen, because having a green card, alone, may not be sufficient to guarantee unimpaired readmission to the U.S. nor may it be sufficient to avoid deportation.

    The simplest of crimes, even where negligent, can cause a lawful immigrant to be deportable. Moreover, rules are constantly changing when it comes to non-USA citizens, and the non-citizen is constantly in jeopardy of losing legal rights, as compared to USA citizens. This Houston immigration lawyer and Miami immigration lawyer urges all eligible green card holders to apply for USA citizenship whenever they become eligible.

    Of course, in these unusual times for our country, the naturalization process to become a citizen has become more expensive, it takes significantly longer and it it is more difficult.

    For further information, I may be reached at bruce.coane@gmail.com or in Texas at  713.850.0066 or in Florida at 305.538.6800

     
  • Coane and Associates,PLLC 8:01 pm on October 17, 2017 Permalink | Reply  

    October in Miami: A Lawyer’s Perspective 

    Here is the view from the office of this Miami immigration lawyer and Miami  discrimination lawyer, today. Our staff is diligently working on our clients’ immigration and discrimination cases from our Florida headquarters in South Beach.

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    While I will be back in our Houston office tomorrow, I personally prefer the view from our South Beach office. Today, I was working on a couple of our local discrimination cases against Kohl’s Department Store and against Checker’s. We are representing clients before the Miami EEOC in discrimination cases against those two companies. Also, we are working on preparing Summons documents after suing Johnson and Wales University in Miami for allegedly discriminating against our client, a Native American at that school. And, finally, we are working on a lawsuit against the Oppenheimer & Co. for religious discrimination where our Jewish client was allegedly taunted with bagel jokes and other derogatory religious comments before they fired him.

    On the immigration side of our practice, I was so pleased to see the approval of our horse trainer client’s case today. We have been working on that case for ten years and it finally got approved. In these times of America First, it is not easy to be getting foreign worker applications approved. However, in this case of the horse trainer from Mexico, we tested the labor market and were able to prove that there were no available USA workers for the job.

    For further information, I can be reached at 713.850.0066 or 305.538.6800, or via email at bruce.coane@gmail.com

     
    • Anonymous 3:17 pm on October 18, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      You are the best Mr Coane

    • Jenn 7:54 pm on October 18, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Great work, Bruce!

      On Tue, Oct 17, 2017 at 3:01 PM, Coane and Associates, PLLC wrote:

      > Coane and Associates,PLLC posted: “Here is the view from the office of > this Miami immigration lawyer and Miami discrimination lawyer, today. Our > staff is diligently working on our clients’ immigration and discrimination > cases from our Florida headquarters in South Beach. While I will” >

  • Coane and Associates,PLLC 8:20 pm on July 6, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: discrimination against disabled employees, , ,   

    Immigration Office Discriminates against the Disabled? 

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    The immigration laws passed by Congress provide special provisions for people with disabilities. In particular, there is a process called disability naturalization, where individuals who cannot learn to speak English or otherwise retain information because of a disability, can be exempted from certain parts of the naturalization process.

    As background, naturalization is the process to become a U.S. citizen. To become a citizen, a person must first, generally, have been a permanent resident with a green card. To obtain citizenship through naturalization, a person must speak English, take a history test and know how to read and write English. An exception to all of this, is if they have a disability such as blindness, deafness, mental disorder, etc.

    While historically, the immigration service has approved many of these cases, I have noticed a trend in Houston lately where the interviewing officers are looking for ways to deny disability naturalization or otherwise give the disabled a hard time. For example, in a case that I  had at the Houston immigration office today, the officer, Ms. C. Arredando, claimed that she could not read the doctor’s writing on the immigration form that the doctor is supposed to complete.

    While doctors may be notorious for their poor handwriting, the doctor’s writing in this case was clearly legible to this Houston immigration attorney. When the officer was losing that argument, she then claimed that the doctor’s signature was not original, but rather a scanned copy. All the while, this poor disabled client who does not speak English was being told she would have to come back (after driving two hours to get there and waiting over an hour until her name was called) another day with a clearer form and original signature.

    Sadly, this is the new reality of how disabled clients may expect to be treated when visiting the Houston immigration office. The notion of the government accommodating people with disabilities does not seem to ring true, from my recent experiences, at the Houston immigration office. Perhaps the current strategy of the Houston immigration office is to frustrate as many people as possible so that they will drop their efforts to become a U.S. citizen.

    For further information, I can be contacted at bruce.coane@gmail.com or 713.850.0066 or 305.538.6800.

     
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  • Coane and Associates,PLLC 8:44 pm on June 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply  

    Police Right to Act as Immigration Officers 

    CBP Officers pay tribute to fellow fallen officers during a Law Enforcement memorial service in Washington D.C.

     

    In certain parts of the country, police are taking it upon themselves to act as immigration officers. In the most recent case of illegal arrests and detentions, Ariel Vences-Lopez, a 23 year old from Minneapolis was detained by a transit rail police officer. Mr. Lopez failed to pay his fare and refused to verbally respond. This led to police officer, Andy Lamers, proceeding to taser and detain Mr. Lopez due to his immigration status.

    In the New York Times article, police Chief John Harrington states that, “it is not his department’s policy to question riders about their immigration status. Harrington said the officer who questioned Vences-Lopez in the video is no longer with the department”. The police officer who over-stepped his power was disciplined.

    While most state governments ensure to keep the line between police officers and immigration officers very clear and even punishable if crossed, the State of Texas encourages their police officers to ask for immigration status under Senate Bill 4 (SB4). This new law signed by Governor Gregg Abbott, grants local police the power to act as federal immigration officers. In an attempt to curb illegal immigration, Texas has taken a very tough stand against immigrants.

    Senate Bill 4, which goes into effect on September 1, 2017 is already creating a lot of negative backlash.  Now a simple act like driving without a license can get you detained and even deported if you are of color. Police are even encouraged to ask for immigration status in domestic violence calls.  In another controversial news story from The Washington Post, a woman was detained after seeking domestic abuse protection at a Texas courthouse.

    For further information, this Houston immigration lawyer and Miami immigration lawyer can be contacted at 713.850.0066, 305.538.6800 or bruce.coane@gmail.com.

     
  • Coane and Associates,PLLC 3:56 pm on October 25, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , K-1 Visa, Visa adjustment   

    K-1 Visa Adjustment of Status and the Affidavit of Support 

    eA very common issue with K-1 visa holders, is whether they need an affidavit of support when they apply for adjustment of status in the USA. After-all, they would have provided an affidavit of support to the USA Consulate at the time that they were applying for the K-1 visa.

    K-1 visa holders must marry their fiance within 90 days of entering the USA. Thereafter, they can file for adjustment of status from the K-1 visa to a green card. The immigration service in the USA will require another affidavit of support with the I-485 form. The question is what to do if the parties are separated or divorced, and the immigrant cannot get another affidavit of support.

    Recently, in the case of Matter of Sesay, the Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA) confirmed that an immigrant can still get a green card even if they are no longer married to the USA citizen sponsor.. What the BIA did not discuss, is what happens to the requirement of the affidavit of support.

    I have had several clients come to my office after entering on a K-1, getting married and divorced, and having their adjustment denied because they had no new affidavit of support. In one case, this month, the immigration service actually approved my client’s green card, even with no new affidavit of support. Fortunately she had a copy of the affidavit of support that was presented at the USA consulate when she got the K-1 visa. That was not enough initially , however, as the immigration service previously denied her adjustment case when she could not provide a NEW affidavit of support. I convinced them to reopen that case, and they approved it.

    I have another K-1 adjustment case in Immigration Court with the same exact issue. Hopefully the immigration judge will agree with me, or the government lawyer will withdraw their demand for a new affidavit of support. In the end, however, the purpose of the affidavit of support is to prove that the immigrant will not become a public charge. You would think that the original affidavit would be enough, or that other evidence would be sufficient to allow fiances to get the green card to which they are entitled under the law.

    __________________________________________________________________________________________________

    About the author: Bruce Coane is an attorney who specializes in labor and employment law and immigration law, with offices in Florida and Texas. He may be reached at bruce.coane@gmail.com, 713-850-0066 or 305-538-6800.

     
    • Troy 9:02 pm on October 25, 2012 Permalink | Reply

      Idiots. The affidavit of support is still in legal effect notwithstanding divorce.

    • Coane & Associates 9:11 pm on October 25, 2012 Permalink | Reply

      We didn’t say it quite that way to the service center, but they rejected that idea and denied the adjustment of status. I’ve seen the same thing on other cases, demanding a new 864, or denying the 485 when you don’t produce it.

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    • Bruce Coane 1:14 am on April 22, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      I am Board Certified in Immigration Law by the Texas Board of Legal Specialization, and available to help on immigration matters throughout the United States and around the world. For appointments call 713-850-0066

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