Tagged: immigration Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • Coane and Associates,PLLC 8:20 pm on July 6, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: discrimination against disabled employees, immigration, ,   

    Immigration Office Discriminates against the Disabled? 

    WPimage

    The immigration laws passed by Congress provide special provisions for people with disabilities. In particular, there is a process called disability naturalization, where individuals who cannot learn to speak English or otherwise retain information because of a disability, can be exempted from certain parts of the naturalization process.

    As background, naturalization is the process to become a U.S. citizen. To become a citizen, a person must first, generally, have been a permanent resident with a green card. To obtain citizenship through naturalization, a person must speak English, take a history test and know how to read and write English. An exception to all of this, is if they have a disability such as blindness, deafness, mental disorder, etc.

    While historically, the immigration service has approved many of these cases, I have noticed a trend in Houston lately where the interviewing officers are looking for ways to deny disability naturalization or otherwise give the disabled a hard time. For example, in a case that I  had at the Houston immigration office today, the officer, Ms. C. Arredando, claimed that she could not read the doctor’s writing on the immigration form that the doctor is supposed to complete.

    While doctors may be notorious for their poor handwriting, the doctor’s writing in this case was clearly legible to this Houston immigration attorney. When the officer was losing that argument, she then claimed that the doctor’s signature was not original, but rather a scanned copy. All the while, this poor disabled client who does not speak English was being told she would have to come back (after driving two hours to get there and waiting over an hour until her name was called) another day with a clearer form and original signature.

    Sadly, this is the new reality of how disabled clients may expect to be treated when visiting the Houston immigration office. The notion of the government accommodating people with disabilities does not seem to ring true, from my recent experiences, at the Houston immigration office. Perhaps the current strategy of the Houston immigration office is to frustrate as many people as possible so that they will drop their efforts to become a U.S. citizen.

    For further information, I can be contacted at bruce.coane@gmail.com or 713.850.0066 or 305.538.6800.

    Advertisements
     
    • www.linux.org 3:02 am on July 9, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Thiѕ is such a fun recreati᧐n annd wwe had a
      perfeⅽt biгthԁay Daddy.? Larry added. ?Can we play ?What?s one of the besst factor about God?

      tⲟmorrow too?? he begged his Mommy.

  • Coane and Associates,PLLC 9:00 am on October 4, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , immigration   

    Another DREAM Act-Deferred Action Case 

    Today, I got hired on another DREAM Act-deferred action type immigration case.

    Too bad the President had to order this program and that Congress is so politicized that they can’t agree to help young people. My new client is a nice 18 yr old girl from Mexico who was brought to America as a baby. She knows how to drive, but can’t get a license; she finished high school, but can’t go to college without proper ID. The State of Texas makes it very difficult for undocumented immigrants to enroll in college and to get a driver’s license.

    Thanks to the DREAM Act, or in particular, the President’s Deferred Action for Childhood arrivals program, I will hopefully get my 18 yr old client a work permit, social security number and a driver’s license in just a few short months. If you want to know more about this program, I made a video about it which you can watch here.

    Almost 100,000 young people have applied under this new program. It is believed that hundreds of thousands more are eligible, but have not come forward yet for various reasons. Some individuals worry that they may be disqualified due to an arrest or a short visit abroad. Our law firm takes on those more difficult cases, as well, and we do consultations to discuss such cases in-person, or via Skype or phone.

    __________________________________________________________________________________________________

    About the author: Bruce Coane is an attorney who specializes in labor and employment law and immigration law, with offices in Florida and Texas. He may be reached at houstonlaw@aol.com, 713-850-0066 or 305-538-6800.

     
  • Coane and Associates,PLLC 3:18 pm on September 15, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: immigration,   

    Israeli Couple Finally Eligible for Green Card 

    I was hired yesterday by an Israeli couple who have been living illegally in the USA for over 20 years. They came to America legally with tourist visas, fell in love here, got married here, and never left.

    The couple had a baby in the U.S., but having a baby does not allow the parents to get any legal status. At the same time, the baby is automatically a USA citizen, by being born in America. However, once that baby grows and becomes an adult, it can sponsor its parents for lawful status when it turns 21 years old.

    Now, 21 years later, this couple’s baby is turning 21, and can now sponsor her parents for legal status in the USA. The parents, who have been living in the shadows for over 20 years, have been running a business, paying significant taxes, and generally helping the economy, all with no legal papers.

    I am looking forward to helping them through the massive amounts of paperwork to get their legal residence, now that their daughter is turning 21. They can finally come out of the shadows and live an even more productive life in America.

    __________________________________________________________________________________________________

    About the author: Bruce Coane is an attorney who specializes in labor and employment law and immigration law, with offices in Florida and Texas. He may be reached at houstonlaw@aol.com, 713-850-0066 or 305-538-6800.

     
  • Coane and Associates,PLLC 1:10 am on September 14, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: immigration, ,   

    Disability Naturalization – A Way for Older Residents to Become a USA Citizen 

    In order to become a USA citizen, a person, generally, must first be a lawful permanent resident (green card) for a number of years. In addition, the person must be able to speak English, pass a history test in English and be able to read and write English.

    U.S. Citizenship Naturalization

    photo: Flickr

    Many older residents are unable to understand English sufficiently to pass the test, and therefore never get USA citizenship. There is a solution for those struggling with English, and that is through disability naturalization.

    The law provides that if a person is disabled, the English language requirements can be waived. At our law firm, we have helped many people become U.S. citizens, where they could not learn English. In order to qualify, the individual must be certified by a doctor to have a disability that prevents them from learning English. Many times this could be onset dementia, Alzheimers, or other less tragic illnesses that may be affecting memory or language skills.

    Any older person who cannot get their naturalization due to lack of English skills should definitely explore citizenship through naturalization through the disability waiver.

    __________________________________________________________________________________________________

    About the author: Bruce Coane is an attorney who specializes in labor and employment law and immigration law, with offices in Florida and Texas. He may be reached at houstonlaw@aol.com, 713-850-0066 or 305-538-6800.

     
  • Coane and Associates,PLLC 4:50 am on June 20, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: amnesty, immigration, ,   

    The New Immigration Status for Young People 

    The government has announced an “amnesty” for young people, via a program called deferred action. Here’s my latest video where I explain the process.

    Basically, the immigration program is for people 30 years old and younger, who came to the USA before the age of 16 and have lived here for at least 5 years. There are other requirements, as well, and each case will be decided based on its own merit. Potential applicants can begin collecting evidence in order to submit it when the government opens the application period.

    __________________________________________________________________________________________________

    About the author: Bruce Coane is an attorney who specializes in labor and employment law and immigration law, with offices in Florida and Texas. He may be reached at houstonlaw@aol.com, 713-850-0066 or 305-538-6800.

     
  • Coane and Associates,PLLC 6:38 am on May 6, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: immigration, , undocumented women   

    War On Undocumented Women 

    Too bad that politics has to interfere with this important immigration law that has been on the books for almost 20 years.

    Read this article from The Huffington Post.

    __________________________________________________________________________________________________

    About the author: Bruce Coane is an attorney who specializes in labor and employment law, and, immigration law, with offices in Florida and Texas. He may be reached at houstonlaw@aol.com, 713-850-0066 or 305-538-6800.

     
  • Coane and Associates,PLLC 1:26 am on April 10, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , immigration,   

    Immigrants Leaving the Work Force 

    Excellent article about lack of workers in some states, due to certain anti-immigrant legislation, like in Arizona.

    States who chase away immigrants are now feeling the brunt of having jobs with no American workers available to fill them. Immigration lawyers have known for decades that there are certain jobs like those described in the attached article, where Americans will not do those jobs, such as picking crops, working in the hot sun, etc.

    __________________________________________________________________________________________________

    About the author: Bruce Coane is an attorney who specializes in labor and employment law, and, immigration law, with offices in Florida and Texas. He may be reached at houstonlaw@aol.com, 713-850-0066 or 305-538-6800.

     
  • Coane and Associates,PLLC 4:52 pm on April 3, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , immigration,   

    Immigrations Officials Arrest Thousands 

    Immigration officials arrested thousands of immigrants this past week. While some were undocumented, others are believed to be lawful residents with a criminal record. Our law firm, Coane and Associates, PLLC represents individuals in such situations, including bond hearings, deportation defense and appeals.

    Here is the complete article link: Immigration Agents Arrest More Than 3,100 in Largest Operation Ever

    __________________________________________________________________________________________________

    About the author: Bruce Coane is an attorney who specializes in labor and employment law, and, immigration law, with offices in Florida and Texas. He may be reached at houstonlaw@aol.com, 713-850-0066 or 305-538-6800.

     
  • Coane and Associates,PLLC 1:40 pm on March 30, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: immigration, , lawful permanent residents   

    Supreme Court Issues Decision Helpful to Immigrants This Week 

    The Supreme Court issued an important decision, Vartelas v. Holder, No. 10-1211, rejecting the retroactive application of a provision of a law passed by Congress in 1996 that has prevented many lawful permanent residents (LPRs) from returning to the United States after a trip abroad. Citing the “deeply rooted presumption” against applying new laws retroactively, the Court ruled 6-3 that LPRs who temporarily leave the country cannot be denied readmission on account of criminal convictions that occurred before the law took effect.

    The Justice Department argued that LPRs with certain criminal convictions may be barred from re-entering the United States any time they leave the country—even if the law in effect at the time of their guilty pleas did not make them eligible for deportation or ineligible for reentry to the United States. The Supreme Court rejected this argument, noting that the government’s interpretation effectively prevented such LPRs from ever leaving the country.

    There are still serious consequences, however, for certain LPR’s with criminal convictions after 1996, who leave the country and try to return. While, historically, they may have had no problems returning in the past, many of these people are now being arrested at the airport upon their return after short visits abroad. Our law firm of Coane and Associates, PLLC continues to represent LPR’s facing these exact problems.

    __________________________________________________________________________________________________

    About the author: Bruce Coane is an attorney who specializes in labor and employment law, and, immigration law, with offices in Florida and Texas. He may be reached at houstonlaw@aol.com, 713-850-0066 or 305-538-6800.

     
  • Coane and Associates,PLLC 3:19 pm on January 3, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Hispanic Voters, , immigration, Pew Hispanic Center survey   

    Deportation and the 2012 Election 

    President Barack Obama hasn’t quite received the satisfactory rating he had with the Hispanic voters in 2010, but a recent survey from the Pew Hispanic Center shows that many Hispanic voters still favor him in the 2012 elections.

    This survey was done with 1,220 Latino adults from all 50 states and the District of Colombia. The results that this survey got may not be conclusive, even though a lot of Hispanics are most likely to vote for him again, the percentage of the poll are divided into the way the Obama administration is handling the country’s general problems and the immigration and deportation problems specifically.

    Obama’s current approval rating among the general population is 46% which is 3% lower than what he received from the Pew survey’s 49%, but in 2010, he received a rating from the Latinos 9% higher at 58%. So what does this say?

    The respondents are aware that the Obama administration deports illegal immigrants faster than the previous administration did, and 77% of those who are aware of this object to the current deportation policies.

    However, high and low the ratings for Obama go, 91% of the respondents are in full support of broad immigration reform, including the naturalization of undocumented residents brought to the US as children, and the DREAM Act.

    ________________________________________________________________________________________________

    Bruce Coane is a leading lawyer with 30 years of experience in the field of immigration law and employment law. He may be reached via email at houstonlaw@aol.com or his website at Coane and Associates.

     
c
Compose new post
j
Next post/Next comment
k
Previous post/Previous comment
r
Reply
e
Edit
o
Show/Hide comments
t
Go to top
l
Go to login
h
Show/Hide help
shift + esc
Cancel
%d bloggers like this: